Creating a Spotify remote with an Arduino and LCD Shield

spotifyremoteThis one is for the Spotify people. We’ve created a small project that makes use of the Arduino and LCD Keypad shield to create a Spotify remote control. This will show the current playing song as well as adding Play/Pause, Prev and Next functionality to it.

Check out the quick YouTube video at the bottom of this page.

The remote is made from a VB.NET application that listens on a select COM port for commands, it also broadcasts the current playing song via the COM port to the Arduino.

You could add a Bluetooth module to this (described in our previous article here) to make it completely wireless, which would be really cool.

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How to use WiFi with the Intel Galileo

GalileoOne of the best features about the Intel Galileo is that it has an mPCIe expansion port for adding various cards to it. One of the cards you can add is for connecting to your wireless network.

The steps below should get you up and running with connecting your Intel Galileo up to your network in the Linux environment and through the Arduino code.

Lets get cracking…

 

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MicroView: Chip-sized Arduino with built-in OLED Display on Kickstarter

oledWhilst browsing Kickstarter we came across these MicroView Ardunio’s which is an Arduino with a built-in OLED Display; as well as providing downloadable libraries for quickly displaying text, sprites, graphs and gauges on the OLED.

The Microview has already reached it’s pledge goal with 27 days remaining (at the time of writing this post)

We think it’s a really unique idea and it would be pretty fun to have one of these if you have a small project in mind that requires some sort of visual display.

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Building a standalone Arduino from scratch and programming it with ICSP

We thought this might be a good topic for the site as it’s something we have done recently, this article will explain how to set up your standalone Arduino project on a breadboard. This will also include uploading your program code via the ICSP connections. This isn’t technically “an Arduino” as we will be not including some components, such as a USB connection, reset switch or any on-board LEDs.

The end result will be a breadboard and your Arduino project running on it, without an actual Arduino board.
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A quick look at the Intel Galileo Arduino/Linux Development Board

GalileoWe’ve had the Intel Galileo for around three weeks now and tested a number of projects on it’s platform. This article will be a quick review and some instructions to get you up and running with your Intel Galileo!

There are more and more distributors now stocking the Galileo; we got ours from RS Components but you can find a list of distributors on the Intel Galileo website just here.

 

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Microcontroller Shootout – Texas Instruments MSP430

launchpad-mspexp430g2-01Ok guys and girls, time for another development board. Today we’re looking at the Texas Instruments MSP430 Launchpad, or more specifically, the MSP-EXP430G2

We’ve never actually played with one of these before but added it to the list as a suggestion from Alex Bradbury on Twitter. Once the board arrived, we opened up the packaging and were pleasantly surprised. Inside we found of shiny new dev board with an M430G2553 chip installed along with an M430G2452 chip, a 32khz crystal and a set of female headers in case you want to swap the factory installed male headers (or maybe to build your own shield). At first I couldn’t work out the difference between the two chips but going back and reading the quick start guide which was supplied with the board, it turns out that the pre-installed M430G2553 includes a USCI module which is capable of hardware UART.

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