Building a standalone Arduino from scratch and programming it with ICSP

We thought this might be a good topic for the site as it’s something we have done recently, this article will explain how to set up your standalone Arduino project on a breadboard. This will also include uploading your program code via the ICSP connections. This isn’t technically “an Arduino” as we will be not including some components, such as a USB connection, reset switch or any on-board LEDs.

The end result will be a breadboard and your Arduino project running on it, without an actual Arduino board.
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Microcontroller Shootout – Arduino Uno

Arduino Uno R3The next Microcontroller we’re going to look at is the Arduino Uno R3 – This is a open source and low cost development board that has an ATmega328 and 14 digital input/output pins (6 can be used as PWM outputs) it also has 6 analog inputs. There is also a USB connection for uploading sketches (programs) from your computer and a ICSP header so you can program it directly if you wish.

We’ll mention it again; this isn’t being directly compared to the other development boards we’re reviewing and hopefully you can make your own mind up regarding what to use after this shootout series. We’ll be doing a summary of all microcontrollers when we come to the end of the Shootout.

There are various types of Arduino available; we chose the Arduino Uno due to the fact that we believe it’s the easiest to get started with and is also the lowest cost of the Arduino family – If you’re just getting started with programming microcontrollers then this would be an entry level product for learning and prototyping.

We’ll be running the same example as we did with the Parallax Propeller, by setting up the board and development environment and flashing an LED with code. Pin 13 is by default an LED actually on the board it’s self, so we’ll be flashing an external LED hooked up to a small breadboard.

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